Category Archives: Solid-Effect

Theoretical Aspects of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in the Solid State: The Influence of High Radical Concentrations on the Solid Effect and Cross Effect Mechanisms

Hovav, Y., et al., Theoretical Aspects of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization in the Solid State: The Influence of High Radical Concentrations on the Solid Effect and Cross Effect Mechanisms. Appl. Magn. Reson., 2012. 43(1-2): p. 21-41.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00723-012-0359-0

Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is used to enhance signals in NMR and MRI experiments. During these experiments microwave (MW) irradiation mediates transfer of spin polarization from unpaired electrons to their neighboring nuclei. Solid state DNP is typically applied to samples containing high concentrations (i.e. 10–40 mM) of stable radicals that are dissolved in glass forming solvents together with molecules of interest. Three DNP mechanisms can be responsible for enhancing the NMR signals: the solid effect (SE), the cross effect (CE), and thermal mixing (TM). Recently, numerical simulations were performed to describe the SE and CE mechanisms in model systems composed of several nuclei and one or two electrons. It was shown that the presence of core nuclei, close to DNP active electrons, can result in a decrease of the nuclear polarization, due to broadening of the double quantum (DQ) and zero quantum (ZQ) spectra. In this publication we consider samples with high radical concentrations, exhibiting broad inhomogeneous EPR line-shapes and slow electron cross-relaxation rates, where the TM mechanism is not the main source for the signal enhancements. In this case most of the electrons in the sample are not affected by the MW field applied at a discrete frequency. Numerical simulations are performed on spin systems composed of several electrons and nuclei in an effort to examine the role of the DNP inactive electrons. Here we show that these electrons also broaden the DQ and ZQ spectra, but that they hardly cause any loss to the DNP enhanced nuclear polarization due to their spin-lattice relaxation mechanism. Their presence can also prevent some of the polarization losses due to the core nuclei.

The interplay between the solid effect and the cross effect mechanisms in solid state 13C DNP at 95 GHz using trityl radicals

Banerjee, D., et al., The interplay between the solid effect and the cross effect mechanisms in solid state 13C DNP at 95 GHz using trityl radicals. J. Magn. Reson., 2013. 230(0): p. 212-219.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmr.2013.02.010

The 13C solid state Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) mechanism using trityl radicals (OX63) as polarizers was investigated in the temperature range of 10–60 K. The solutions used were 6 M 13C urea in DMSO/H2O (50% v/v) with 15 mM and 30 mM OX63. The measurements were carried out at ∼3.5 T, which corresponds to Larmor frequencies of 95 GHz and 36 MHz for the OX63 and the 13C nuclei, respectively. Measurements of the 13C signal intensity as a function of the microwave (MW) irradiation frequency yielded 13C DNP spectra with temperature dependent lineshapes for both samples. The maximum enhancement for the 30 mM sample was reached at 40 K, while that of the 15 mM sample at 20–30 K. Furthermore, the lineshapes observed showed that both the cross effect (CE) and the solid effect (SE) DNP mechanisms are active in this temperature range and that their relative contribution is temperature dependent. Simulations of the spectra with the relative contributions of the CE and SE mechanisms as a fit parameter revealed that for both samples the CE contribution decreases with decreasing temperature while the SE contribution increases. In addition, for the 15 mM sample the contributions of the two mechanisms are comparable from 20 K to 60 K while for the 30 mM the CE dominates in this range, as expected from the higher concentration. The steep decrease of the CE contribution towards low temperatures is however unexpected. The temperature dependence of the OX63 longitudinal relaxation, DNP buildup times and 13C spin lattice relaxation times did not reveal any obvious correlation with the DNP temperature dependence. A similar behavior of the CE and SE mechanism was observed for 1H DNP with the nitroxide radical TEMPOL as a polarizer. This suggests that this effect is a general phenomenon involving a temperature dependent competition between the CE and SE mechanisms, the source of which is, however, still unknown.

The interplay between the solid effect and the cross effect mechanisms in solid state 13C DNP at 95 GHz using trityl radicals

Banerjee, D., et al., The interplay between the solid effect and the cross effect mechanisms in solid state 13C DNP at 95 GHz using trityl radicals. J. Magn. Reson., 2013. 230(0): p. 212-219.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmr.2013.02.010

The 13C solid state Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) mechanism using trityl radicals (OX63) as polarizers was investigated in the temperature range of 10–60 K. The solutions used were 6 M 13C urea in DMSO/H2O (50% v/v) with 15 mM and 30 mM OX63. The measurements were carried out at ∼3.5 T, which corresponds to Larmor frequencies of 95 GHz and 36 MHz for the OX63 and the 13C nuclei, respectively. Measurements of the 13C signal intensity as a function of the microwave (MW) irradiation frequency yielded 13C DNP spectra with temperature dependent lineshapes for both samples. The maximum enhancement for the 30 mM sample was reached at 40 K, while that of the 15 mM sample at 20–30 K. Furthermore, the lineshapes observed showed that both the cross effect (CE) and the solid effect (SE) DNP mechanisms are active in this temperature range and that their relative contribution is temperature dependent. Simulations of the spectra with the relative contributions of the CE and SE mechanisms as a fit parameter revealed that for both samples the CE contribution decreases with decreasing temperature while the SE contribution increases. In addition, for the 15 mM sample the contributions of the two mechanisms are comparable from 20 K to 60 K while for the 30 mM the CE dominates in this range, as expected from the higher concentration. The steep decrease of the CE contribution towards low temperatures is however unexpected. The temperature dependence of the OX63 longitudinal relaxation, DNP buildup times and 13C spin lattice relaxation times did not reveal any obvious correlation with the DNP temperature dependence. A similar behavior of the CE and SE mechanism was observed for 1H DNP with the nitroxide radical TEMPOL as a polarizer. This suggests that this effect is a general phenomenon involving a temperature dependent competition between the CE and SE mechanisms, the source of which is, however, still unknown.

Solid effect in magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

Corzilius, B., A.A. Smith, and R.G. Griffin, Solid effect in magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization. J. Chem. Phys., 2012. 137(5): p. 054201-12.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4738761

For over five decades, the solid effect (SE) has been heavily utilized as a mechanism for performing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Nevertheless, it has not found widespread application in contemporary, high magnetic field DNP experiments because SE enhancements display an omega(0) (-2) field dependence. In particular, for nominally forbidden zero and double quantum SE transitions to be partially allowed, it is necessary for mixing of adjacent nuclear spin states to occur, and this leads to the observed field dependence. However, recently we have improved our instrumentation and report here an enhancement of varepsilon = 91 obtained with the organic radical trityl (OX063) in magic angle spinning experiments performed at 5 T and 80 K. This is a factor of 6-7 higher than previous values in the literature under similar conditions. Because the solid effect depends strongly on the microwave field strength, we attribute this large enhancement to larger microwave field strengths inside the sample volume, achieved with more efficient coupling of the gyrotron to the sample chamber. In addition, we develop a theoretical model to explain the dependence of the buildup rate of enhanced nuclear polarization and the steady-state enhancement on the microwave power. Buildup times and enhancements were measured as a function of (1)H concentration for both trityl and Gd-DOTA. Comparison of the results indicates that for trityl the initial polarization step is the slower, rate-determining step. However, for Gd-DOTA the spread of nuclear polarization via homonuclear (1)H spin diffusion is rate-limiting. Finally, we discuss the applicability of the solid effect at fields > 5 T and the requirements to address the unfavorable field dependence of the solid effect.

Solid effect in magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

Corzilius, B., A.A. Smith, and R.G. Griffin, Solid effect in magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization. J. Chem. Phys., 2012. 137(5): p. 054201-12.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4738761

For over five decades, the solid effect (SE) has been heavily utilized as a mechanism for performing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Nevertheless, it has not found widespread application in contemporary, high magnetic field DNP experiments because SE enhancements display an omega(0) (-2) field dependence. In particular, for nominally forbidden zero and double quantum SE transitions to be partially allowed, it is necessary for mixing of adjacent nuclear spin states to occur, and this leads to the observed field dependence. However, recently we have improved our instrumentation and report here an enhancement of varepsilon = 91 obtained with the organic radical trityl (OX063) in magic angle spinning experiments performed at 5 T and 80 K. This is a factor of 6-7 higher than previous values in the literature under similar conditions. Because the solid effect depends strongly on the microwave field strength, we attribute this large enhancement to larger microwave field strengths inside the sample volume, achieved with more efficient coupling of the gyrotron to the sample chamber. In addition, we develop a theoretical model to explain the dependence of the buildup rate of enhanced nuclear polarization and the steady-state enhancement on the microwave power. Buildup times and enhancements were measured as a function of (1)H concentration for both trityl and Gd-DOTA. Comparison of the results indicates that for trityl the initial polarization step is the slower, rate-determining step. However, for Gd-DOTA the spread of nuclear polarization via homonuclear (1)H spin diffusion is rate-limiting. Finally, we discuss the applicability of the solid effect at fields > 5 T and the requirements to address the unfavorable field dependence of the solid effect.

Have a question?

If you have questions about our instrumentation or how we can help you, please contact us.